Carbon Nanotube Tapes up to 5 cm wide!

This video demonstrates the array of carbon nanotube tapes that DexMat currently produces. Strong, conductive, and flexible tapes or films up to 5 cm wide are currently available and even wider tape formats are currently under development.

These tapes have tremendous potential in applications ranging from EMI shielding in cables/electronics, to thermal interface materials, to heating elements or conductive materials in clothing or e-textiles.

SBIR Funding Furthers DexMat CNT Technology

Source: Original article appears in the December 2018 issue of the Wire Journal International.
The feature on DexMat is on pages 48-50.

DexMat CNT Tape as Lightweight EMI Shielding

In this video we explain how DexMat’s carbon nanotube (CNT) tape has been used to replace the two EMI copper shielding braids typically used in RG316 cables. The performance of DexMat prototypes matches standard RG316 performance, while reducing the total weight of the cable by 50%!

The shielding effectiveness and insertion loss results for the CNT and Cu shielded cables are shown below. The CNT tape shielded cables have the following advantages:

  • Overall RG-316 cable weight reduction of CNT shielded vs. Cu double braid shielded cable without connectors is over 50%
  • CNT tape shield is 100 microns thick compared to 500 micron thick Cu double braid shield
  • Easy to apply CNT tape to coaxial as well as twisted pair type cables
  • Wide range of CNT tape widths and lengths are available for purchase
  • CNT tape shielded cables survive at least 1000 flex cycles with a minimum bend radius of at least 7.5X the jacketed cable diameter

Source: https://dexmat.com/cnt-products/cnt-tape-film/

Specification Sheet: DexMat fiber, tape, and cable specs Dec-2018

DexMat CNT Tape Shielded Cables Offer 50% Weight Reduction

Houston, TX- 12/11/2018. Working in collaboration with Minnesota Wire & Cable Company, DexMat has produced carbon nanotube (CNT) tape shielded RG-316 cables that perform comparably to copper (Cu) double braid shielded RG-316 cables. However, the CNT tape shields are 95% lighter than the copper double braid shields. The shielding effectiveness and insertion loss results for the CNT and Cu shielded cables are shown below. The CNT tape shielded cables have the following advantages:

  • Overall RG-316 cable weight reduction of CNT shielded vs. Cu double braid shielded cable without connectors is over 50%
  • CNT tape shield is 100 microns thick compared to 500 micron thick Cu double braid shield
  • Easy to apply CNT tape to coaxial as well as twisted pair type cables
  • Wide range of CNT tape widths and lengths are available for purchase
  • CNT tape shielded cables survive at least 1000 flex cycles with a minimum bend radius of at least 7.5X the jacketed cable diameter

Source: https://dexmat.com/cnt-products/cnt-tape-film/

Specification Sheet: DexMat fiber, tape, and cable specs Dec-2018

DexMat SpaceCom 5 Minute Pitch

November 28, 2018. Out of the original 17 semi-finalists, DexMat was selected as one of 5 finalists to pitch at the 2018 SpaceCom Entrepreneur Summit in Houston, TX, for the opportunity to win the $100,000 Entrepreneur Challenge. As a runner-up, DexMat won $20,000 in Google Cloud Credits.

Click here for more information on the SpaceCom Entrepreneur Summit.

DexMat Named as SpaceCom Entrepreneur Challenge Semi-Finalist

HOUSTON – SpaceCom – The Space Commerce Conference and Exposition, where NASA, aerospace and industry come together to connect, announces the finalists of the SpaceCom Entrepreneur Challenge. Taking place at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston November 27-28, this challenge is the culmination of the SpaceCom Entrepreneur Summit (SES). The Entrepreneur Challenge began with 56 startup applicants. Through the first round of judging, that number was narrowed to 23 and now 17 semi-finalists who will present during the first day of the SpaceCom Entrepreneur Summit, Tuesday, November 27.

The semi-finalists include:

  • Arlula
  • Benchmark Space Systems
  • Cemvita Factory Inc.
  • Devali Inc
  • DexMat, Inc. 
  • EXOS Aerospace Systems & Technologies
  • Finsophy Inc.
  • Hedy-Anthiel Space Systems
  • Lazarus 3D Inc.,
  • Lucid Drone Technologies, Inc.
  • LunaSonde, LLC
  • Molon Labe LLC
  • SaraniaSat Inc.,
  • Solstar Space Company
  • STARK Industries LLC
  • Sugarhouse Aerospace
  • Swift Data LLC

At the culmination of day one, five finalists will be selected to present during a pitch competition. The winner will then be selected after the final round of pitches during the general session November 28 at 1:30 PM. During this presentation, members of the audience and a panel of judges will select the grand prize winner. These finalists are eligible to win the below prizes provided by Google Cloud for Startups:

  •  $100,000 in Google Cloud credits to the competition winner
  • $20,000 in Google Cloud credits for runners up
  • $3,000 in Google Cloud credits for every qualified entrant in the competition

Additional prizes include:

  • Guaranteed extended meeting with an investment firm
  • Speaking role at SpaceCom 2019
  • A booth at SpaceCom 2019

Source: https://spacecomexpo.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/SES-Finalists-Press-Release.final_.pdf

DexMat at IDTechEx, Santa Clara, 2018

Last month we had the opportunity to show off our carbon nanotube yarns and films at the IdTechEx conference in Santa Clara, CA. In this video, Dmitri describes the various materials and applications that we spoke about at our booth. It was a great show, and we are excited to return to other IdTechEx events in the future!

DexMat Featured in Wire Journal International

Source: Original article appears in the October 2018 issue of the Wire Journal International.
Free subscription is required to read the digital version of the article. The feature on DexMat is on pages 52-53.

DexMat Awarded Phase I SBIR: Robust Lightweight CNT Wiring for Space Systems


Abstract: 
NASA is challenged to find ways of effectively shielding sensitive electronic equipment from electromagnetic interference (EMI) without adding significant weight to space flight vehicles and satellites (the heavier they are the more fuel they need to achieve orbit).  EMI shielding for wire and cables is an attractive opportunity for weight reduction. However, with the advent of highly reusable next generation space vehicles, wiring must be not only light weight, but also strong and robust, capable of withstanding extreme conditions, intense vibration and long lifecycles. It is important that wire weight reductions do not come at the expense of mechanical strength or EMI shielding effectiveness.  DexMat is developing a novel and highly conductive Carbon nanotube (CNT) EMI shield product that will allow for significant weight reduction without compromising mechanical strength or shield effectiveness. CNTs are advancing as the most promising solution for reducing the weight of spacecraft wires.  The shielding effectiveness of CNT materials is comparable to that of heavy metal braids, but at a fraction of the weight.  Compared to a copper wire with the same diameter, a CNT fiber has 6 times higher strength, more than 6 times lower density,  and at least 25 times higher flexure tolerance, essential qualities for conductors in aerospace applications. Under this Phase I project, DexMat will develop CNT shielding braid (made from CNT yarn from Dexmat) that can potentially increase the mechanical strength of CNT tape used as a primary EMI shield. These CNT braids will be of different thicknesses and area coverage, to augment the performance and product appeal of CNT tapes. Additionally, DexMat will begin to conduct the first accelerated aging tests to determine the impact on mechanical strength of shielding made with CNT tapes, CNT yard braids, and hybrid CNT tape/braid combinations.

Potential NASA Applications: 
The first planned product to contain DexMat technology is lightweight CNT cables. CNT cables combine high strength, electrical and thermal conductivity with low density, making them ideal for aerospace applications where weight reduction is a priority, including reusable next generation space vehicles and satellites. Given the tremendous costs associated with satellite launches, NASA and the aerospace industry will see substantial savings from our CNT-based wire.

Potential Non-NASA Applications: 
DexMat CNT technology has applications in the military aircraft and commercial aviation markets, to effectively reduce weight of aircraft and satellite designs.  For a single-aisle aircraft, a 1% reduction of in weight can lead to a net cost savings of $240K-$1.6M per year in use. For larger aircraft, the savings can reach $2.4-5M. Additional applications include wearable electronics, eTextiles and bioelectronics.

Electrical Interconnect Applications for Carbon Nanotubes in Military Aerospace Systems

Flexible, lightweight, and versatile CNTs are becoming a valuable material in conductor applications for the military and a host of other markets.

Carbon nanotubes are one of the most unique and interesting materials developed in the last decade. These products, widely known as CNTs, can be manufactured by various methods, but are most commonly made using chemical vapor deposition, a high-temperature manufacturing process used to create durable, solid, high-performance materials. The end result is a paper-like, ultra-thin sheet that can be further processed into a variety of forms suitable for a wide range of applications.

This material can become an electrically charged carbon sheet with some very special properties that are of great utility in conductor development. CNT sheets can be spun into fiber-like strands and twisted into various configurations that simulate copper stranding. An insulated jacket is then extruded on top of the carbon nanotube to create a wire. The resulting product is approximately one-eighth the weight of a typical copper conductor wire and has a strength-to-weight ratio 117 times that of steel. Additionally, because the material is fundamentally a type of plastic, it does not have the same fatigue characteristics as copper wire.

CNT technology can also be used to replace copper shields. By simply taking a thin CNT sheet and wrapping it around the wires to form a shield (see Figure 1), designers can achieve substantial weight savings over copper shields.

Challenges to CNT Adoption

Cost

CNT technology has had limited viability for use in many aerospace applications due to its higher initial costs. However, costs are coming down quickly. In the early development years of CNTs, the material cost around 500 times as much as copper. Today, the cost is closer to 10 times that of copper and, within the next five years, CNT is expected to command only a 20–30% price premium.

Electrical Conductivity

The electrical conductivity of CNT technology is vital to its overall success in electrical interconnect applications. In the early research and development phase, the resistivity of electrically charged CNTs was about 200 times that of copper. More recently, that value dropped down to only 20 times that of copper. Now samples from manufacturers are getting closer to 10 times the resistivity of copper. The current objective for leading developers of this technology is to bring it down to five times that of copper. If that happens, it will be a real game-changer.

EMI Protection

Lightweight shielding is very important to the defense industry, and CNTs show great promise here. Currently, CNT shields exhibit performance similar to copper at frequencies above 1GHz, but performance drops off significantly, especially at frequencies below 100Mhz. The weight savings over copper can be as much as 80%, though, so there is a trade-off that largely depends on an application’s EMI requirements. Solutions include using a combination of a CNT shield with a smaller-gauge copper shield, which could still reduce weight and perform reasonably well.

Termination

A lot of investigative work has been done on both crimping and soldering CNT material. To date, the crimp method shows the best results from a viability standpoint. Current mil spec standard tools and crimp contacts

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Connectors

Initial research into using CNTs to advance connector technology has focused on two primary areas: coaxial cables with RF connectors and mil standard 1553 data bus cables with dedicated discrete connectors. There are also efforts to evaluate CNTs with standard 38999 Series III connectors, as well as with miniature push-pull circular connectors commonly used in soldier systems. With the exception of the RF connectors, the preliminary results are encouraging, and show viability. However, this application may require some minor modifications to either the contacts or to the inserts. More research is still needed.

Manufacturers

The development of carbon nanotubes is truly a global effort led by several universities, including Rice University in Houston, that collaborate with CNT producers. Over the last few years, manufacturers in the US, Japan, and other countries have significantly scaled up production to help reduce costs to the point at which CNTs can become a viable multi-use product. These suppliers of CNT yarns and sheets are also working closely with several wire manufacturers to produce primary wire, cables, and RF coaxial cables.

Electrical Applications

One immediate application being evaluated by the defense industry is the replacement of copper-based 1553 database cables with CNT conductors and shields. The weight savings they offer can be upwards of several pounds, which is an especially significant advantage for space applications, as each pound of payload typically costs upwards of $10,000 to launch into space. Electrical testing has already been conducted to determine the signal integrity loss of CNT conductors and shields and has returned surprisingly good results, showing little signal loss degradation on lengths up to 10–15 feet, which will only improve as the conductivity of CNT materials continues to improve.

In addition to the space market, two helicopter manufacturers in the United States are conducting independent test studies to determine the viability of CNT materials for use in the rotary wing market.

A Bright Future for CNTs

CNT’s unique set of properties is helping the material find a place in applications across nearly every industry. CNTs are currently being employed in and evaluated for applications including optical power detectors, radar absorption, microelectronics, transistors, thermal management, solar panels, and even body armor. With this versatility, the future looks extremely bright for carbon-nanotube-based products.

Original story by by Tom Briere on June 20, 2017